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Crumpled paper and a paper airplane on a dark blue background
Photo by Matt Ridley on Unsplash

As Himmelfarb Library begins the transition into Our New Normal, you may have questions about where to access certain services and resources we provide. Here’s a guide on what you’ll find available online and in-person.

Online

All of our e-journals, e-databases, and e-books remain available online. We also provide our Documents2Go service entirely online, where you can request articles unavailable in our collection.

We offer instructions on downloading and installing our mobile apps to your device.

There is a host of information available on our Research Guides, everything from question banks to anatomy images, and much more!

Himmelfarb’s Reference team is also available online. Our chat service is monitored by reference staff 8:30AM-8PM EST Monday through Thursday and 8:30AM-5PM EST Friday. Have a question a little too involved for chat? We can also schedule individual meetings with a reference librarian via WebEx. Email us at himmelfarb@gwu.edu to start the process!

In-Person

In addition to our print collection available in our book stacks, you can also find our multimedia collection, audiovisual collection, and software resources on the third floor, in the Bloedorn Technology Center.

Our special collections, the Humanities & Health collection, Historical collection, and Healthy Living collection, are all accessible in-person.

Some of our older journals are kept in on-site storage as bound volumes. You can request a specific volume for perusal by following the instructions on our Borrowing and Requesting page.

Anatomy models are available in various places throughout the library. Our skeletal models and bone boxes are up on the third floor. Heart and brain models can be checked out at the Circulation desk.

If you have any questions about access as we move forward with Our New Normal, reach out to us at himmelfarb@gwu.edu or call the Circulation Desk at 202-994-2962.

Himmelfarb Staff Member 3D Prints Face Shields for Health Care Workers

GIF of face shield being printed
Click to watch: 3D printing process

 

John Lopez, Himmelfarb Library’s Data Technician, has joined an initiative to 3D print face shields for healthcare workers. John shares how he became involved in the project, and what the process entails.

How did you learn about the face shield printing initiative?

I initially read an article about a hospital in Brescia, Italy which was hit hard by the pandemic. They were running out of valves used for their respirators which the manufacturer couldn't provide quickly enough, so a small startup company reversed engineered the valve and began 3D printing them, which the hospital then used. The article quickly became viral just as COVID-19 reached the states.

I began noticing online 3D printing communities around the world organizing similar efforts once Josef Prusa - the founder of Prusa Lab in Prague, Czech Republic - released an open-source face shield design, made available for anyone with a 3D printer to produce. Various iterations were soon released, but the Prusa face shield design proved to be the most effective among health care workers.

image of a face shield
3D-printed face shield

Are you partnering with a particular organization or initiative?

I joined the volunteer effort started by Open Works, a makerspace workshop based in Baltimore who were among the first to mobilize volunteer makers with an organized and efficient plan to provide face shields to local healthcare systems and hospitals. A chain of custody is established via email registration, as each 3D print file is assigned a unique parts number which helps keep track of how many face shields were printed by a volunteer.

What part of the shield is 3D-printed?  What other materials do you need for assembly, and where can you get them? Is there a standard for what material the face shield should be made of (e.g., thickness)?

image of face shield components
Face shield components

image of face shield components

image of face shield components

The face shield is actually a printable headband, as well as a printable chin strap which serves as a mount for the visor; both are included in the 3D print file. An elastic cord, along with the actual clear acrylic visor, are required to complete assembly, both of which are done at Open Works once they receive completed face shields.

PETG is the type of filament material primarily used to print the face shields, which can be purchased on Amazon for example. It's preferred due to its rigidity and because it can be sterilized more efficiently than other types of printing material such as PLA. There is indeed a printing guideline for makers to follow which sets the parameters to prevent the face shield from breaking.

How long does it take to print the shield frames?

The average print time when following the recommended print settings can take up to 6 hours for a single face shield. There are certainly a variety of ways to print faster by tinkering with hardware, such as changing the nozzle size, but it's not encouraged as strength and quality of the model are prioritized over speed.

Are you using the library’s 3D printer?

I'm grateful for my two 3D printers at home since the library's 3D printer service hasn’t been accessible.

Roughly how many have you assembled so far?

Volunteers had been asked to print at least three face shields each during the early weeks of the pandemic. The incredible response from volunteers reached a saturation point in mid-April as thousands of face shields had been made. Since then my focus has been printing ear straps for face masks.

face shield components
Face shield components

Once they’re assembled, how do you get them to their destination?

Once a face shield is done printing, I wear nitrile gloves to remove the part from the print bed and follow the sanitation checklist provided by Open Works. A liability waiver is also signed then sent along with the face shields through USPS.

Is there a website (or several websites) you would recommend people visit for more information?

A good starting point for anyone with a 3D printer looking to join local volunteer efforts in their area

https://getusppe.org/makers/

COVID-19 Supply Chain Response: Essential Information

https://3dprint.nih.gov/collections/covid-19-response/essential-info

Article re: 3D printed valve parts used in hospitals throughout Italy
https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-51911070

Blog post from Josef Prusa about face shield design
https://blog.prusaprinters.org/from-design-to-mass-3d-printing-of-medical-shields-in-three-days/

Open Works/Makers Unite/We the Builders - the volunteer org I had joined for printing the face shields
https://www.wethebuilders.com/projects/11

The group was mentioned in a recent article from The Economist:

https://www.economist.com/united-states/2020/04/30/americas-makers-and-tinkerers-turn-their-hands-to-ppe

NIH’s 3D Print Exchange now has downloadable designs for PPE and devices, including the Prusa face shield and face mask ear savers:

Prusa Protective Face Shield

https://3dprint.nih.gov/discover/3dpx-013409

Surgical Mask Tension Release Band for Ear Comfort & Extended Use

https://3dprint.nih.gov/discover/3dpx-013410

Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee workers traveling to communities, 1980s
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) workers traveling to communities, 1980s: Women between the ages of twenty and fifty are recruited by BRAC to teach oral rehydration therapy. Because Bangladeshi culture does not always allow women to travel far from their homes, men chaperone the workers and introduce them at each village they visit. Courtesy BRAC Bangladesh

The Himmelfarb Library and the SMHS Office of Diversity and Inclusion will be hosting the National Library of Medicine (NLM) exhibit:  Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health.

Per the National Library of Medicine, Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health examines stories of the community groups that are making a difference in global health around the world. People are working on a wide range of issues—from community health to conflict, disease to discrimination. As we learn more about the challenges of the past, we join a growing community of people committed to global health. A revolution in global health is taking place—see this exhibition and learn more."

The exhibit will be located on the first floor of Himmelfarb Library from October 21 until November 20, 2019.  We hope you will visit!

,br.

3d4
Cathepsin B (1CTE) protein

Our 3D printer has been in use for almost a year, and in that time the Himmelfarb community has printed some incredible 3D models!

 

3D printing has applications in both medical education and practice. It has impacted everything from patient-specific anatomical models to quicker implant production, and more precise drug creation in the pharmaceutical industry. Researchers have even explored combining 3D printing techniques with human cells to create transplantable organs.

For more information, check out our 3D Printing LibGuide. Stop by the computer workstation to the left of the Himmelfarb entrance to submit your 3D print job today!

3d1
Cytosine + adenine nucleotides (green & yellow), transfer RNA (black), protein molecules (white)
3d2
Beta sheet from PDB 1SA8
3d3
Cytosine + adenine nucleotides (green & yellow), transfer RNA (black), protein molecules (white)

The Health Risk of Where You LiveBored of the default graphing options on Microsoft Excel? Want to take your data visualizations to the next level?

Tableau is a software program which allows users to create stunning
visualizations of their data. Users can import data in a number of formats (an Excel spreadsheet, for example) and Tableau will help them create graphs and charts that go beyond what they can do in programs like Excel.

There is a free version of the program called Tableau Public if you’re interested in downloading this and giving it a try. For those who work in SMHS, the folks at CASS (Computer and Applications Support Services) recently added Tableau Public to the software center to make it available for you to download on your work computer.

Be sure to explore Tableau Public's gallery of examples including The Health Risk of Where You Live, Ohio, 2017 by Joshua Smith.

Bring your ideas to life as 3D printed objects!

Courtesy of a grant from the GW Hospital Women's Board, Himmelfarb Library now has a 3D printer available to faculty, residents, students, and staff of GW's School of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Nursing, Milken Institute School of Public Health, the GW Medical Faculty Associates, and the GW Hospital.

Use our 3D Printing at Himmelfarb guide to learn about Himmelfarb's 3D printing policies and FAQs, where to find 3D models, and to learn about scholarly uses of 3D printing!

CranialnervesHow do you learn?

Do you know the twelve cranial nerves (of Christmas)?

A recent article in Anatomical Sciences Education explores how mnemonics and rhymes can be an important learning strategy.  Read the article to learn more about how mnemonics and rhyme relate to learning processes and neuroanatomy.  And, watch the video to learn the twelve cranial nerves of Christmas:

 

Image citation: Lynch, P.J. (2011). Brain human normal inferior view with labels.  Retrieved from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brain_human_normal_inferior_view_with_labels_en-2.svg

visiblebodyWant to study heart and lung anatomy?  Other aspects of human anatomy? Do you want an interactive anatomy atlas on your iPad?  Himmelfarb has the Visible Body Anatomy Atlas for you!

Visible Body Human Anatomy Atlas provides a new way to study and explore anatomy. This online anatomy atlas allows you to view specific structures and layers from head to toe, rotate anatomical models, and explore systemic and regional anatomy.

Visible Body Human Anatomy Atlas includes 5,000+ medically accurate anatomical structures and was developed by medically trained illustrators and reviewed by anatomists. This atlas allows you to explore human anatomy via multiple approaches: systemic anatomy, regional anatomy, cross sections, senses, and muscle actions.

To install, download the app from an on-campus location (or from off-campus while you have Cisco AnyConnect turned ‘on’).  To maintain access to the app,  open your Visible Body app while on-campus or  while off-campus and connected via Cisco AnyConnect at least every 150 days.

Capture

How do you teach?  If you’re interested in adding innovation to your instruction, check out online modules made available by GW faculty!

Online teaching materials and modules serve as  great teaching tools in medical education.  GW’s SMHS and CNHS faculty have published these tools in the AAMC’s MedEdPortal, which houses open-source materials.  The teaching materials provide access to multiple documents, including powerpoints, guides, and surveys.

Some of the topics covered by the modules are newborn care, OB/GYN, navigating the wards and more!

Check out the modules here!

 

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