UHP Trivia Night 2020

Who was the legendary Benedictine monk who invented champagne? What do you call a duel between three people? What is the closest city to the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull?

That’s right, the UHP is hosting a trivia night!

Join us on Sunday, March 29 for UHP trivia from 4-7 PM. We’re bringing in a professional trivia host and filling up the Vern’s Post Hall to give YOU the opportunity to show everyone how much stuff you know! I bet you know SO much stuff!

Tables at the event will hold teams of up to 10. If you’re signing up with a team, each person will need to sign up individually – make sure you decide your team name before signing up! And please, make sure it’s unique enough that you won’t be overlapping with other teams. Single players or smaller teams should sign up and will be grouped together to form a full table. Snacks will be provided, as will prizes for the winning table!

Also…feel free to invite a faculty member that you want on your team! Those faculty truly can be an excellent asset…

Sign up below!

The Hunt for Lost Nazi Uranium Colloquium

Check out the following colloquium event passed along by Professor Kung!

Title: The Hunt for Lost Nazi Uranium

Abstract: 1944 saw the height of the Manhattan Project efforts which was distributed between Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Hanford. Since the Manhattan Project was spurred by the fear that Germany was building nuclear weapons, Allied anxiety continuously pondered the Nazi atomic progress. As Germany began to fall, Gen. Groves commissioned the military and scientific intelligence mission code-named Alsos. It was to be at the forefront of the defeat so as to immediately assess the German advancement towards an atomic bomb. Alsos uncovered what the Manhattan Project had feared: the Germans had a two-year lead on the American nuclear program and being the birth place of nuclear fission, the Germans began with an incredible sprint of discovery. But then they found, just as the Americans were getting their feet wet, the German program miraculously had slowed. In April 1945 in the sleepy village of Haigerloch, Alsos found the culmination of the German nuclear program: a failed reactor experiment, named B-VIII. It was on the scale of Enrico Fermi’s successful Chicago Pile 1. This incomplete nuclear reactor, built of 664 uranium cubes had come very close to criticality. What had happened? How did Germany miss the mark? The answer is straightforward: unlike the U.S. efforts, spearheaded by Groves’ singular defining military force, the German atomic program was not administered by a competent manager. Their adequate resources were distributed and not gathered, their superb intellect was competitive and not collaborative. The failure of their atomic program can be pinned to a critical mass of German confidence moderated by ego and arrogance. Had they more humility and collaboration, history would have taken a different path. Instead, their reactor was scattered to history. What happened to the German B-VIII reactor? The United States acquired it; however, the question remains: what did they do with it?

When? Thursday, Feb. 20, from 4-5 PM

Where? In Corcoran 101

Sunday Brunch with the UHP!

March 1 (next Sunday). 11am (until 1pm). Townhouse Club Room. Be there!! We will have:

  • Free brunch food
  • Board games
  • Student staff Ronnie (always a delight)
  • The warm, comforting lighting of the Club Room chandeliers on a cold March morning
  • The UHP community!

RSVP below if you’ll be coming!

Islam in India and Pakistan: A Historical Look into Interreligious Dialogue

Check out the following event passed along by Professor Aviv!

Please join us on Thursday, February 20 at 5pm in the Marvin Center, Room 307 for the 2020 Berz Lecture: “Islam in India and Pakistan: From the First Conquests to the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA)”

Speaker: Dr. Shankar Nair, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, University of Virginia

Abstract: As the still young Islamic empire spread into the lands of India, Muslims encountered, for perhaps the first time, a grand-scale religious civilization entirely unmentioned in the Qur’an or in the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad. With so little explicit guidance from their scriptural sources, how were Muslims to navigate this new land or make sense of the incredibly diverse Hindu populations of South Asia? Though one might have expected Muslims to reject Hindus outright as mere idolaters and unbelievers, the historical response was surprisingly nuanced and accommodating. As modern nationalist forces in the region threaten to overturn this legacy, this talk surveys the often forgotten history of Islam in South Asia, offering insights into how the region arrived at the crises it faces today.

Advice from The (Peer) Advisors: Doing Homework Is a Skill?

Image of Peer Advisor Gwen Umbach

Check out the following study tips from Senior Peer Advisor Gwen Umbach (CCAS ’20)!

On the second day of this semester, the slam of my apartment door startled me from a social media stupor yet again, to see my homework spread around me, long since abandoned. I hadn’t intended to spend thirty minutes checking my notifications, I actually wanted to get ahead on my work this time.

UHP students are notorious even within GW for doing lots of things at once, and for me one of the biggest challenges of college has been keeping myself focused enough to finish all those things. Though it’s always a struggle, this semester I’ve finally managed to implement some of the great advice I’ve gotten over the years, and I want to share a of the few things that have actually helped me not only start my work, but finish it.

As the brilliant Ben Faulkner pointed out to me, not all homework is created equal, and choosing what to work on first helps maximize time. Whether you’re a morning person, or one who only does homework when it’s dark out, knowing what time of day you focus best (not just when you’re the most
panicked) helps manage those assignments that require the most brainpower. Similarly, when I have lots of assignments to do in a night, working from hardest to easiest, or giving myself easy work between the hard assignments, has helped make my brainpower last much longer than it used to.

The second and the biggest change I made to my work habits was defining where I work. In high school, I always studied at home, and when I started college I continued that without any real thought, but over time it has become apparent that I am terrible at concentrating in my own home. After trying most places on campus, I have finally settled on the DC Public Library as my place for more intensive homework. For easier or less pressing work, I choose a different location—maintaining the sanctity of
the library as a hard-work-only zone has helped me stay on task when it matters the most. Regardless of what the best place is for you, finding it and committing to it makes a big difference.

The last, and hardest, piece of making a work schedule, has been the actual ‘schedule’ part: deciding when to work. This is the advice that I heard repeatedly from professors and advisors, and failed repeatedly to put into place: Block off time for homework, and if anyone asks you to hang out during those times, say you’re busy. In order to stay focused, not just during one afternoon but in the long term, consistency is key. That means tricking your brain into thinking that you absolutely have to sit down and work, even though there is nobody forcing you to follow through. This is a big adjustment to make from high school, where parents, teachers, and coaches oversaw most of our activities and knew if we skipped out on something. And it’s even harder when you start long-term projects like an honors thesis, that might require a lot of self-discipline. Last semester, I utterly failed at this. I ditched my scheduled work hours for activities with friends, campus events, and even peer advisor meetings. Now, though, I’m holding to that schedule (so far), and it has made a huge difference in the amount of work I get done.

It is both frustrating and heartening to realize that now, as I’m about to leave GW, I have finally discovered some strategies for working and studying that I can actually stick to. As useful as this would have been four years ago, it’s remarkable to think about how far my habits have evolved from where I was in my first year. I’ve finally accepted the reality that study habits are a skill to be practiced, and despite the many question marks in my future as a soon-to-be-graduated senior, I’m starting to trust that as time goes on, I will continue to improve at the skills that I’ve gotten a grasp on in college. Even when I still find myself hopelessly distracted, it’s comforting to know that if I’ve come this far, I can get even better in the years to come.

The UHP Takes On Nats Park!

Yup, that’s right! We’re heading over to Nationals Park on April 7th at 7PM to see our dear World Series Champions face off against the Miami Marlins. Tickets are only $7 (and include a $10 food voucher!), and we’ve only got 30 of them, so sign up quick!

Sign up below by February 28th at 5pm to put yourself in for a spot, and then you’ll need to pay in cash by March 13 at 5pm to confirm your reservation.

Food for Thought w/ Prof. Engstrom!

That’s right folks– our first Food for Thought of the semester is right around the corner! Join us on February 21st from 12-1 PM for free lunch and an interesting talk about Geography, satellite imagery, and population estimates! Read the note from Professor Engstrom for more details, and sign up on the form below that!

People and Pixels: Mapping Population Characteristics using Satellite Imagery

This presentation will cover using satellite imagery to map variations in population
characteristics including poverty, income, and population density at multiple spatial scales
within a range of countries. My recent research has focused on extracting contextual features
from satellite imagery and determining their ability to improve estimates of population
characteristics in low and middle income countries at wide range of spatial scales. Contextual
features can be defined as the statistical quantification of edge patterns, pixel groups, gaps,
texture, and the raw spectral signatures calculated over groups of pixels or neighborhoods.
These features were originally designed for facial recognition software and have been adapted
to use with satellite imagery. Results have found that these features are highly correlated with
poverty, income, and population in Sri Lanka, Belize, and Ghana at scales from cities to entire
countries.

Published at 19, ft. Chris Zuniga

Join me for a Book Talk I am hosting on January 28th, 2020 in the basement of Gelman at 6:00 PM. There, I will talk about my journey in getting published and what it really is to sit down and write and know that your work will become part of the public discourse. The event doubles as a University Academic Workshop. While I will be speaking on the industry and how to navigate it, I will delve into the structure, teachings, purpose, and content of my book. How I Became a Traitor will publish in April 2020.

There will be time for Q&A. Ask questions about anything. I’ll answer.

If you’re looking to learn more about the book and my journey, follow me on Instagram (@AtChrisZuniga) and read the section below.

Enjoy your day. Thank you.

_______________________

Story of My Book

My name is Chris Zuniga, and I am the author of How I Became a Traitor. I wrote this book because I have had enough of the social isolation I and others experience for the “discrepancy” between our genetics and our ideas. The biggest obstacle in rebuilding our political and social arena in modern-America is the very social isolation I speak of. I believe the cause of it to be the same people who claim to understand the struggles of others and champion their causes as allies. Sympathy is not empathy. At the sight of my people’s brown skin, we are greatly “valued” by social advocates because we “matter and deserve a seat at the table”. But when we disagree, we are “traitors” and simply “not woke enough.”

Conservatism is not Republicanism, but the recent conflation of the two things has damaged our country. By conflating personal and social values to objective policy prescriptions that do not necessarily correspond with them, we force ourselves into a corner with our faces toward the wall. There’s no way we can begin to sympathize with something we corner ourselves into never understanding. At its core, my book is about the obvious truth no longer commonly practiced: politics is beyond appearance.

My hope is that, in reading this book, you will understand that conservative principles reach far below the surface of everyday liberal-conservative politics. I hope to instill in you the same passion and excitement that I have for understanding society’s facade of understanding the marginalized for its own social and political gain. Ultimately, I want you to see this book as a tool to help you gain special insight into the experiences of everyday people like me, who are assumed by outsiders to have specific ideas, characteristics, and experiences simply because of the way we look. More importantly, this book will help you grow closer to who you are as an individual and more confident in your control of the life you choose to lead.

How I Became a Traitor is a non-fiction book that speaks to everyone interested in the intersection between politics, values, and identity.

 

 

The Book – How I Became a Traitor

The book is written in 3 Parts….

Part 1: The Betrayal — Through stories like that of Antonia Okafor, Ashleen Menchaca-Bagnulo, and my own in the context of my family’s journey across the Southern Border, readers will understand identity politics beyond its definition, as well as how its adoption tears our social fabric.

Part 2: The Battle — Through stories of institutional and social suppression and outright racism, readers will learn how identity politics labels everyday minorities as either “tokens” or “traitors.”

Part 3: Our Truce — An exclusive conversation with writer and political commentator Steven V. Roberts will contrast today’s political arena with the recent past, demonstrating how a two-minute change in mindset is enough to restore political unity, promote social progress for all, and treat the country of its politics-by-appearance.

 

 

What I Need & What You’ll Get

This book will be published with New Degree Press. I set up the pre-order tiers to help cover the costs for publishing my book. Money raised will go towards the following:

  • The Editor I will work with to revise and publish my manuscript in April 2020
  • The Cover Design of my Book — the mockups you see currently are a placeholder!
  • The Layout Design for the interior of my book (Physical Copy, Ebook Formats)
  • The Copyediting for My Book — to help polish the grammar and spelling prior to publication
  • The Launch & Promotion Efforts for my book — when I ultimately publish this Spring

When I pre-sell 100 copies of my book, I will publish. When I pre-sell 150 copies of my book, I will also publish an audiobook. When I pre-sell 200 copies of my book, I will publish a hardcover edition. When I pre-sell 250, I will publish a translated version in Spanish.

I am also offering some exclusive rewards for people who pre-order my book now. When I publish, you will receive the following :

  • A personally signed copy of my book
  • A personal thank you note for pre-ordering my book
  • Your Name will appear in a Special, Acknowledgements Section of my book (“with Special Thanks to”)
  • Early access to the Introduction of my Book.
  • The opportunity to help give me feedback and be involved in selecting my cover
  • I will do a book topic/workshop seminar where I will share experience the experiences of writing my book
  • An Invitation to my Launch Party

 

 

About the Author

Chris Zuniga is an Honors student at The George Washington University, studying Political Communication and Sociology.

Born into an undocumented and poor family in inner city Passaic, Chris experienced crime, poverty, a struggling school system, and hopelessness. Yet, his ideology isn’t what you expect it to be. Having always been put on the spot for his in-the-minority beliefs, Chris learned to manipulate negative attention to his benefit at a young age. He owes this skill to those who try to isolate and discredit him, as he says they “cluelessly promote my success by giving me a platform. They make things like this book a reality”.

In 2017, Chris’s outspokenness earned him national press and an invitation to the Rose Garden for a formal address by the President of the United States. Chris wants a career supporting Black and Latino youth in navigating “toxic, but particularly toxic ‘liberal’ spaces” through imparting what he has learned in his journey from the fourth Most Miserable City in the United States (Business Insider) and into the pinnacle area of elitism, Foggy Bottom/Georgetown in Washington DC.

Chris speaks publicly at a variety of events and aspires to gain a platform where he can make social commentary that he believes will change mindsets, outlooks, and lives. In his free time, he dedicates himself to just that, having previously spoken at Universities, State Board meetings, Boards of Education, Tedx Conferences, and soon, his readers and podcast listeners.

For more information, you can connect with Chris via email at AtChrisZuniga@gmail.com, on Instagram @AtChrisZuniga, and on LinkedIn.

 

 

Risks & Challenges

The biggest challenge with publishing a book is delivering the finished book to the backer, specifically my mailing of the book to you. I have eliminated this risk by building into the campaign the mailing and shipping costs of your signed copies to you within each pre-order tier.

The risk of delivering the pre-sale copies of my book is contingent on the publisher we use. I will be working closely with New Degree Press to make sure we get the earliest possible ship date of the signed book copy to you. We will keep all pre-sale backers up-to-date as my book hits each key milestone and publishes. You will know when the copies of my book you pre-ordered are expected to ship.

 

 

Other Ways You Can Help

Some people just can’t contribute, but that doesn’t mean they can’t help:

  • Please Share my Pre-sale Campaign on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn with your friends, family and network. Please use #IAmATraitor and tag me as well as my publisher, New Degree Press, so we can help amplify your efforts.
  • You can easily share my Pre-Sale Campaign Page via Indiegogo at the top of the page
  • Please share my book with five friends, family members, or co-workers who you think would enjoy it. Please do this as a text message or direct message on social media.

Thank you so much for all your love and support!

Thanks again,
Chris Zuniga

Welcome to the New Blog!

Welcome, dear UHPers, to the NEW UHP BLOG! This space has a lot of fun new features, like a simplified menu, pages for Community Life and Openings and Opportunities, and a Featured Image of the Week (just a little bit to the right!).

Community Life

On this page, you’ll find the latest posts on upcoming events, peer advisor articles, and other community life news!

Openings and Opportunities

Here, you’ll see a complete summary of the job, internship, and research assistantship opportunities that people want to put before you UHPers, as well as other opportunities like the SURE and Strasser awards.

Calendar

To your right, you’ll see a calendar of our upcoming events, as well as a list of those upcoming events below that calendar.

Submit a Post

Did you know that any UHP student can submit a post to our blog? Now of course just because you submit something doesn’t mean it’ll be approved, but if you have an event or an opportunity you want your fellow UHPers to know about, don’t hesitate to submit a post up there!

 

GW is committed to digital accessibility. If you experience a barrier that affects your ability to access content on this page, let us know via the Accessibility Feedback Form.