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Please come out to GW Hunger and Homeless Awareness Week 2017 events this week to help support those struggling with these issues in our community and discuss these topics with engaging speakers. When attending an event, the recommended donation is a canned good or packaged donation. Below is the schedule for the week!

Monday, November 13, 7pm-8pm

Changing the Rhetoric Panel

Marvin Center 3rd Floor Amphitheatre

Join Speakers from GW Police, the Foggy Bottom Community, and Street Sense Media as they discuss Homelessness on Campus and in our Community.

 

Tuesday, November 14, 8:00pm-9:30pm

Roosevelt at GW Presents A Panel to Discuss Homelessness in DC

GW School of Media and Public Affairs Room 309

Join A Conversation with Elissa Silverman, DC Councilmember, James Davis, Vendor and Policy Advocate, Street Sense Media, Eve Zhurbinskiy, GW Student and Commissioner of ANC2, and Morgan Kane, Commander of the First District, MPD.

 

Wednesday, November 15, 7pm-8pm

Street Sense Theatre Workshop Presents Timone of DC.

814 20th Street, NW Room 202

Join the directors, writers, and performers of Street Sense as they transform Shakespeare’s play, Timon of Athens, into a contemporary exploration of the impulses behind giving and receiving.

Sponsors: GW Faculty Senate Committee on University & Urban Affairs, GW Department of Theatre & Dance, GW Trachtenberg school of Public Policy & Public Administration

 

Wednesday, November 15, 7pm-8pm

Hunger Banquet

Marvin Center 307

Sponsors: GW Student Association & GW International Student Community

 

Thursday, November 16, 7pm

Find Your Expression Open Mic Night

Marvin Center 3rd Floor Continental Ballroom

View performances by Street Sense Media.

 

Suggested Donation: One Canned/Packaged Donation at the Door

At the end of each semester, the Nashman Center hosts the Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship. This event invites students, faculty, and community partners to share their experiences, disseminate findings, and learn about many other campus/community initiatives.

The Fall Symposium will take place on Friday, December 8th, Marvin Center 3rd floor. Students involved in a service-learning project will have an opportunity to present posters and be recognized for their work. Contact Wendy Wagner for more information at wagnerw@gwu.edu.

Posters will be presented during the 3-4pm session, where there will be a reception as well. Poster guidelines are as follows:

Poster Parameters/Guidelines

  • You don’t have to be present to have your poster be present at the symposium-however you must drop your poster off at the Nashman Center by Thursday, December 7th at 5:00 pm if you wish to have your poster presented without you. If you want to present with your poster you need to be in the Marvin Center grand ball room with your poster by 3:00 to present until 4:00 during the reception.
  • Posters don’t have to be fancy, “science fair” style posters dimensions 28” x 40” or 36” x 48” are perfect but if you have something prepared that’s in the ball park of these dimensions that is okay. We’ll have tables set up so if you have a tablet or laptop showing videos, photos or audio to accompany your board –there’s a place for that (just make sure they are charged before-hand since we won’t have access to outlets).
  • Individual OR group/organization OR class poster presentations are welcomed and encouraged!

To participate in the GW Symposium Poster Session, please contact rachellt@gwu.edu by with November 20th with the name of your group and whether you intend to present your poster in person or submit it for display.

Poster Highlights

  • Posters should be clear about who YOU are (name of the group) and who YOUR COMMUNITY PARTNER is.
    • Include the name of your partner organization, their mission and relevant programs, and how they partnered with your group
  • The emphasis of this event is community-engagement as a scholarly endeavor. This means we emphasize:
    • What you learned/are learning
    • The outcomes/intended outcomes for the community you are working with
  • Be sure your poster is clear about how your work is a demonstration of community-engaged scholarship.
    • Show how you are trying to learn about an issue or answer a question through the service or community action

Examples of categories to include in Community Action and Service posters (your poster may not have all/any of these depending on your action/service scholarship):

  • What did you learn/are you learning by engaging in this initiative?
  • What were your research questions or inquiry models?
  • Did you collect any information? (data, charts, interviews, photos, historic data)
  • How will your work impact this policy issue or community problem?

Here are a few other opportunities to choose from for students at the Fall 2017 Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship:

9:30-10:15 am Faculty Breakfast

Presentations and discussion about current and community partnerships in DC Public Schools from the Nashman Center’s Engage DC program and VISTA leadership. Learn more about opportunities to engage your students and your scholarship with the DC Public School System.

10:30-11:45am Sessions, Marvin Center, 3rd Floor:

Direct Service and Pathways to Citizenship

Student panelists are engaged in direct service experiences through a variety of GW courses.

Moderated by Amy Cohen, Executive Director of the Nashman Center

- Community Engaged Scholarship & Entrepreneurship at GW

Student panelists are engaged in social entrepreneurship through a variety of GW programs, including the GW New Venture Competition and the Knapp Fellowship for Entrepreneurial Service-Learning.

Moderated by Scott Stein, Associate Director, Student Entrepreneurship Programs

- Civic House Proposals for GW Engagement

Students in the Civic House program propose new GW partnerships to address issues such as food insecurity in DC, LGBTQ+ Civil Rights, and homelessness

Moderated by Colleen Packard, Graduate Coordinator of Civic House

12:00-1:15pm Lunch Marvin Center, 3rd Floor please note lunch is free but you must RSVP for lunch at this link http://evite.me/Gxv4dt8uKN

1:30-2:45pm Sessions, Marvin Center, 3rd Floor:

Community Engagement in STEM Fields

Student panelists are engaged in the community through a STEM course.

Moderated by Tara Scully, Department of Biology

 Operación Impacto: Daring to step up in our commitment to Civic Values and Civic Action

Students engaged through coursework in Spanish 3040 and through Operación Impacto and   Chávez~Huerta 2018 will present their work, vision and experiences. The Campaigning for Change award will be introduced as part of a call to action during this session.  Note: while all are welcome to attend, this session will be conducted in Spanish.

Moderated by Dolores Perillan, Spanish program

Senior Well-being in DC

Students in the Human Services and Social Justice program present their findings and recommendations for DC as an “Age Friendly City” to staff from the DC Office on Aging.

Moderated by Emily Morrison, Program Director of Human Service and Social Justice

Eco Equity Challenge

In Washington, D.C., under-served communities bear the burden of the worst environmental hazards.  The Eco Equity Challenge provides students with funding to implement a project that brings together sustainability and social justice to make a real impact in communities in the District.  Join this workshop to explore the concept of environmental justice and begin to develop your own idea for a project with the guidance of our staff.  Applications for the Eco Equity Challenge are accepted through February 16th.

Moderated by Jonathan Butler and Kimberly Williams

The Nashman Center would like to invite all members of the Foggy Bottom community interested in tackling the issue of homelessness to GW Roosevelt Institute's Panel to Discuss Homelessness in D.C.

Nashman Panel.jpg

 

During the 2016 election, GW participated in the All In Challenge, committing to student civic engagement and increasing student voter rates. At the first All In Challenge Awards Ceremony, held on October 19, 2017 at the Newseum, GW was awarded a bronze seal for a student voting rate between 50% and 59%.

Bronze (on screen).png

Student participation in elections has increased in the past few years. A recent report,
“Democracy Counts: A Report on U.S. College and University Student Voting” from the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement, an initiative of Tufts University’s Institute for Democracy in Higher Education, shows that between the 2012 presidential election, and the
2016 presidential election, student voting went from 45.1% of eligible voters in 2012 to 48.3%
in 2016 – a 7% improvement.

“I am proud to honor The George Washington University with an All In Challenge bronze seal in recognition of their dedication, hard work, and achievement,” said Zaneeta E. Daver, director of the All In Campus Democracy Challenge. “The George Washington University is not only ensuring that a more representative population participates in our nation’s democracy, but is educating students to be civic-minded. They are an example to be emulated.”

The All In Campus Democracy Challenge is a national awards program. The Challenge encourages higher education institutions to help students form the habits of active and informed citizenship, and make democratic participation a core value on their campus. By joining the Challenge, campuses commit to:

• Convening a campus-wide committee that includes members from academic affairs,
student affairs, and the student body, as well as any other relevant stakeholders;
• Developing and implementing an action plan to improve democratic engagement;
• Participating in the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE) in
order to measure student voting rates; and
• Sharing their campus’ action plan and NSLVE results in order to be eligible for a
recognition seal and/or awards.

More than 300 campuses, enrolling more than 4 million students, have joined the Challenge
since its launch in summer 2016.

Faculty and students may be interested in this event on November 18th from 1-2 pm.

From Me to We at GWU is sharing research into the investigation of the Flint, Michigan water crisis and highlight the role of grassroots and formal policy efforts in preventing similar crises in the future.

You can view the invitation to the event here

We are hoping that all our faculty will consider taking part in an FLC (Faculty Learning Communities) in 2018 we are excited to announce that we've been awarded a small grant to support this work from Campus Compact. Click here to see what FLCs are offered and for information on how to join them https://nashman-center.squarespace.com/config/pages/58176f9d29687f5a8abaee47

Chloe King is a Knapp Fellow working to reduce food waste in DC schools, partnering with the World Wildlife Fund, where she interned last year. She is also co-founder and president of GW Scuba Club and studied abroad in Indonesia. Aleena Khan, a service-learning scholar here at the Nashman Center, spoke to Chloe about her compelling project and her experience as a Knapp Fellow.

Chloe King Headshot.jpeg

Aleena: Can you briefly describe your project?

Chloe: Last year, I was interning for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in the fall of 2016 on their Food Waste Team – so I when I initially started, I was thinking, “How on earth does food waste relate to wildlife?” and that was normally a big question that people have when they hear about the WWF and the Food Waste Team. Why do they have that team?

Food and agricultural production are one of the biggest threats to wildlife on the planet, and at the same time, we’re wasting 38-40% of the food that we produce for consumption. It’s a massive problem, and one that I learned more about throughout the course of my internship there. My boss, Pete Pearson, was wonderful; he just said – partially because he was stressed by so many projects – to just pick whatever I want, and that I’ll manage it.

So, I picked schools – they’ve always wanted to start a project in schools – so I started developing a curriculum. I’ve developed a lesson plan, PowerPoints, educational posters, activities, things like that for an age range of 5th grade and up that’s really adjustable. I worked for them for that whole fall semester and were finalizing all those materials and other work as well that the team was doing. I then went abroad last year, from January until August, for 7 months, so I was not involved with food waste for a while.

When I was away, I heard about the Knapp Fellowship and I applied for it with the aim of working with the WWF when I got back. I knew that, regardless of whether or not I would have gotten [the Fellowship] that I wanted to work with the WWF again, since I wanted to complete what I had already done.

This big push this time around was to do it really locally and utilize the fact that the headquarters were here. There’s a lot of people in the office that have experience doing these kinds of food waste audits, and essentially being able to go into schools and helping them perform the food waste audits. At this point now, it’s really been about getting the approval of the people in DC, like the Department of General Services, DC Public Works, DCPS and the bureaucracy there, the Organization of Superintendent Schools and Education (OSSE). That’s essentially what’s been going on so far, with the project.

The plan, ultimately, is to get a lot of feedback from teachers this year when we’re actually doing the audits in the lunchroom and teaching kids about food waste so we can put this all on our website and have teachers all over the nation collecting data about food waste audits in their schools and collecting donations as well and getting that to food banks and people that need it.

A: What is the process of partner acquisition?

C: It’s been a little bit difficult and part of the reason that I love working with WWF so much is that it’s a really respected organization within the conservation space and also within the education space – kids sort of grow up looking at the Panda calendars. It’s a really good networking device to use, which is why I’ve enjoyed working with them.

Typically, I’ll reach out to them and say, “Hi, my name is Chloe and I’m from the WWF Food Waste Team; this a project that we’re working on, how can we help you?” Ultimately, what we’re trying to do is to give schools the resources to pursue this and have it be as simple as possible for them to take on. Initially, I thought that I would just reach out to a principal and they would be interested and that would be it, but it’s been way more complicated than that.

It’s mostly been about getting a really interested parent or teacher that are already engaged in stuff like this. A lot of the schools I’ve already talked to have school gardens or have been doing an environmental curriculum previously. In terms of reaching out to the local government, that’s been fairly easy because there’s been a lot of initiatives in DC in regards to food waste.

Councilman Mary Shay, for Ward 3, has been really big into food waste initiatives, so she’s been helping us with networking and getting approval because we can’t just walk into a public school and start something. That’s also been a big barrier that I hadn’t quite been aware of; we’ve had to get approval from all these different agencies before we could even begin any curriculum work. But, we’ve gotten all the approval we need and have sort of sent out information and have set a soft deadline of November 1st.

A: How has the Knapp Fellowship aided with your project?

C: The WWF does have a lot of resources, but at the same time, it is a large organization. Having a certain amount of money that I can use separate from WWF that I can really use to fulfill a need is really nice. Transportation costs become really expensive, since I’m taking the metro back and forth between sites, so it’s also helped with that.

I’m ideally hoping to use the money to hire other students that have interest in this. I gave a presentation on food waste in my climate change and policy class and asked everyone at the end that if they’re interested or know how to do audits, then I could pay them or give them a $50 gift card for doing it and a lot of people were interested in doing it. I have a good friend who interned for the WWF’s Food Waste Team this past summer, so I’m going to try to have her help me as well. That’s all what I’m probably going to use the money for.

Also, if schools need any materials, such as buckets, scales, sorting materials, I could buy them those supplies. It’s just nice to know that I have this funding available to actually pursue the project, because if I was just doing it on my own, it would be really difficult.

A: How has your project personally impacted you?

C: I’ve always been interested in the food system and how it’s worked – I’ve been a vegetarian since I was ten – but I never understood how big of an issue food waste was until I started working at WWF. I think that itself has been a really big learning experience for me, kind of learning about the other side of the food system. I think the biggest impact is going to be seeing children learn; I cannot tell you how many hours I’ve spent developing this lesson plan, and it’s going to be so nice to see it out there and to see students learn it as well as getting that immediate feedback from teachers.

A: What advice would you give to someone who’s unsure about applying for the Knapp Fellowship or is unsure if their idea is developed enough to apply for the Fellowship?

C: I think I myself applied to it literally a week before the deadline. I was thinking more and more about it and realized that it would be so helpful in aiding what I wanted to do. Even at that point, I didn’t really have much of a concrete project, but it was really helpful that I had interned at WWF before and knew it was something that I wanted to go back to. So, I would recommend for anyone who wants to apply for the Fellowship to have an organization in mind. In my experience so far with developing this project, having the resources, people, and team at the WWF that I can talk to about this has been critical to this project. Even if you don’t have a direct connection to an organization, try to foster a relationship with them. All these organizations are trying to do the same thing, and you have the unique opportunity to be the one who unites them all towards a single project, which I think it really cool to do with a student.

The Knapp Fellowship for Entrepreneurial Service-Learning makes it possible for exceptional GW students to combine scholarship with action and change the world. Prizes of up to $10,000 will be given out to student-led service projects.

Don't miss your chance to apply! The 2018 application is live now and is due by January 12, 2018. For questions about the Knapp Fellowship or for mentorship with your idea contact Wendy Wagner at wagnerw@gwu.edu

Dani is a senior in CCAS majoring in Human Service and Social Justice. Anthony Hammani, a community engaged scholar at the Nashman Center, sat down to talk to Dani about her experiences in service-learning courses, HSSJ, and what she will take away from the program.

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 1.50.22 PM.png

Dani first learned about the HSSJ program in Phyllis Ryder's University Writing course, a service-learning class. She wasn't aware of service-learning before she found herself thrown in the middle of it, and now you'll find her saying, "Everyone should take service-learning!"

It allowed her to become more engaged in the community and she changed majors to take more service-learning courses. The expectation was to engage the community in authentic ways so she registered for more of them.

In Dr. Wendy Wagner’s Ethical Leadership course, there was not a direct service experience, but a group project co-created with a community partner.  Her group worked with Thompson Elementary, planning and executing field trips to Smithsonian Museums, including pre and post reflection worksheets that aligned the trips with the social studies curriculum. By working on this group project, she learned to observe group dynamics, reflected on her own leadership practice, and also had the opportunity to delve into the field of education.

The focus of the class was to examine the evolving scholarship of leadership, applying a variety of theories to the real word examples that emerged through their group projects.

Community-engaged scholarship strengthened the academic work. Dani learned to apply theory to inform how she worked with her peers, with the Thompson students and the teachers. She has taken a lot of classes without a service-learning component, and found it difficult to understand how those subjects applied in the real world.

When applying theory to real life, Dani took things she was learning in class such as positivism and trait leadership and explored the extent to which those approaches worked for each service-learning group that met outside of class. The groups spent time reflecting on how leadership theory informed and explained how they were able to work together, "The things we talked about in service-learning classes do directly apply to real life."

Dani went on 4 or 5 Saturday field trips with 5th graders. Thompson Elementary is dominantly Latinx and she identifies as Latina. Dani found it cool to connect with students in that way and said that students were both “hilarious to interact with” and “ brilliant.”

To explore the learning objectives of one trip, Dani talked about the civil war and compared it to contemporary events and social environments the students were all experiencing now. The experience solidified the importance of social studies for her and she was able to support that curriculum by helping to develop the program.

Overall, throughout all of her service-learning experiences, Dani felt learning how to ask the right questions was important. She said knowing that you have to ask questions and listen to feedback from  community partners and participants. She says the service-learning experience is not impactful for community participants or you if you don’t do so. It was difficult for her to understand this at first, but has become the foundation for how she serves today.

Chloe King is a Knapp Fellow working to reduce food waste in DC schools, partnering with the World Wildlife Fund, where she interned last year. She is also co-founder and president of GW Scuba Club and studied abroad in Indonesia. Aleena Khan, a service-learning scholar here at the Nashman Center, spoke to Chloe about her compelling project and her experience as a Knapp Fellow.

Chloe King Headshot.jpeg

Aleena: Can you briefly describe your project?

Chloe: Last year, I was interning for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in the fall of 2016 on their Food Waste Team – so I when I initially started, I was thinking, “How on earth does food waste relate to wildlife?” and that was normally a big question that people have when they hear about the WWF and the Food Waste Team. Why do they have that team?

Food and agricultural production are one of the biggest threats to wildlife on the planet, and at the same time, we’re wasting 38-40% of the food that we produce for consumption. It’s a massive problem, and one that I learned more about throughout the course of my internship there. My boss, Pete Pearson, was wonderful; he just said – partially because he was stressed by so many projects – to just pick whatever I want, and that I’ll manage it.

So, I picked schools – they’ve always wanted to start a project in schools – so I started developing a curriculum. I’ve developed a lesson plan, PowerPoints, educational posters, activities, things like that for an age range of 5th grade and up that’s really adjustable. I worked for them for that whole fall semester and were finalizing all those materials and other work as well that the team was doing. I then went abroad last year, from January until August, for 7 months, so I was not involved with food waste for a while.

When I was away, I heard about the Knapp Fellowship and I applied for it with the aim of working with the WWF when I got back. I knew that, regardless of whether or not I would have gotten [the Fellowship] that I wanted to work with the WWF again, since I wanted to complete what I had already done.

This big push this time around was to do it really locally and utilize the fact that the headquarters were here. There’s a lot of people in the office that have experience doing these kinds of food waste audits, and essentially being able to go into schools and helping them perform the food waste audits. At this point now, it’s really been about getting the approval of the people in DC, like the Department of General Services, DC Public Works, DCPS and the bureaucracy there, the Organization of Superintendent Schools and Education (OSSE). That’s essentially what’s been going on so far, with the project.

The plan, ultimately, is to get a lot of feedback from teachers this year when we’re actually doing the audits in the lunchroom and teaching kids about food waste so we can put this all on our website and have teachers all over the nation collecting data about food waste audits in their schools and collecting donations as well and getting that to food banks and people that need it.

A: What is the process of partner acquisition?

C: It’s been a little bit difficult and part of the reason that I love working with WWF so much is that it’s a really respected organization within the conservation space and also within the education space – kids sort of grow up looking at the Panda calendars. It’s a really good networking device to use, which is why I’ve enjoyed working with them.

Typically, I’ll reach out to them and say, “Hi, my name is Chloe and I’m from the WWF Food Waste Team; this a project that we’re working on, how can we help you?” Ultimately, what we’re trying to do is to give schools the resources to pursue this and have it be as simple as possible for them to take on. Initially, I thought that I would just reach out to a principal and they would be interested and that would be it, but it’s been way more complicated than that.

It’s mostly been about getting a really interested parent or teacher that are already engaged in stuff like this. A lot of the schools I’ve already talked to have school gardens or have been doing an environmental curriculum previously. In terms of reaching out to the local government, that’s been fairly easy because there’s been a lot of initiatives in DC in regards to food waste.

Councilman Mary Shay, for Ward 3, has been really big into food waste initiatives, so she’s been helping us with networking and getting approval because we can’t just walk into a public school and start something. That’s also been a big barrier that I hadn’t quite been aware of; we’ve had to get approval from all these different agencies before we could even begin any curriculum work. But, we’ve gotten all the approval we need and have sort of sent out information and have set a soft deadline of November 1st.

A: How has the Knapp Fellowship aided with your project?

C: The WWF does have a lot of resources, but at the same time, it is a large organization. Having a certain amount of money that I can use separate from WWF that I can really use to fulfill a need is really nice. Transportation costs become really expensive, since I’m taking the metro back and forth between sites, so it’s also helped with that.

I’m ideally hoping to use the money to hire other students that have interest in this. I gave a presentation on food waste in my climate change and policy class and asked everyone at the end that if they’re interested or know how to do audits, then I could pay them or give them a $50 gift card for doing it and a lot of people were interested in doing it. I have a good friend who interned for the WWF’s Food Waste Team this past summer, so I’m going to try to have her help me as well. That’s all what I’m probably going to use the money for.

Also, if schools need any materials, such as buckets, scales, sorting materials, I could buy them those supplies. It’s just nice to know that I have this funding available to actually pursue the project, because if I was just doing it on my own, it would be really difficult.

A: How has your project personally impacted you?

C: I’ve always been interested in the food system and how it’s worked – I’ve been a vegetarian since I was ten – but I never understood how big of an issue food waste was until I started working at WWF. I think that itself has been a really big learning experience for me, kind of learning about the other side of the food system. I think the biggest impact is going to be seeing children learn; I cannot tell you how many hours I’ve spent developing this lesson plan, and it’s going to be so nice to see it out there and to see students learn it as well as getting that immediate feedback from teachers.

A: What advice would you give to someone who’s unsure about applying for the Knapp Fellowship or is unsure if their idea is developed enough to apply for the Fellowship?

C: I think I myself applied to it literally a week before the deadline. I was thinking more and more about it and realized that it would be so helpful in aiding what I wanted to do. Even at that point, I didn’t really have much of a concrete project, but it was really helpful that I had interned at WWF before and knew it was something that I wanted to go back to. So, I would recommend for anyone who wants to apply for the Fellowship to have an organization in mind. In my experience so far with developing this project, having the resources, people, and team at the WWF that I can talk to about this has been critical to this project. Even if you don’t have a direct connection to an organization, try to foster a relationship with them. All these organizations are trying to do the same thing, and you have the unique opportunity to be the one who unites them all towards a single project, which I think it really cool to do with a student.

The Knapp Fellowship for Entrepreneurial Service-Learning makes it possible for exceptional GW students to combine scholarship with action and change the world. Prizes of up to $10,000 will be given out to student-led service projects.

Don't miss your chance to apply! The 2018 application is live now and is due by January 12, 2018. For questions about the Knapp Fellowship or for mentorship with your idea contact Wendy Wagner at wagnerw@gwu.edu

The 2018 Nashman Faculty Learning Communities (FLC) are forming now. These small inter-disciplinary/inter-professional groups meet monthly for one year to discuss and learn collectively about their topic of interest. All GW faculty and administrators are welcome. Click here for information about other FLC's forming for 2018.

The 2018 Nashman FLC: GW Response to Violence Against Women

Co-chairs: Laurie Kohn and Erin Scheick, GW Law School

Are you interested in engaging in an interdisciplinary exploration of topics pertaining to violence against women, including intimate partner, domestic, and sexual violence? Are you seeking to broaden your perspective of anti-violence movements? Would you like to be a part of an intellectual community seeking to establish innovative University-wide responses to violence against women in our local community?

The purpose of this FLC is to build community across disciplines, nourish academic scholarship and research, encourage reflection and innovation regarding approaches to addressing violence against women, and establish a project that reflects GW’s commitment to addressing violence against women in the D.C. metropolitan area.

Interested applicants should have a demonstrated interest in violence against women, and/or academic or hands-on backgrounds in anti-violence, anti-oppression, or women's studies, or a thirst for being part of a FLC that harnesses the collective resources of the University to address the problem of violence against women locally.

To apply, please email your response to the following items to Wendy Wagner (wagnerw@gwu.edu) by December 15, 2017.

  • Name
  • Title/School affiliation
  • What do you anticipate contributing to the FLC?
  • What do you hope to gain from participating in the FLC?
  • What is your relevant background in intimate partner, domestic, or sexual violence and/or women's studies?
  • Are there constraints in your schedule that would affect meeting times or planning?

The FLC will convene monthly and will involve moderate reading in preparation for our meetings. Our goal is to ultimately undertake an inter-discipinary/inter-professional initiative that is relevant to the topic of violence against women.

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