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Poster presentations are now being accepted through the Call for Posters at the The Globalsl Network 6th Summit, November 3 - 5, 2019, at Clemson University. Early bird registration open now!

Founded nearly a decade ago, with the aim of improving quality in community-campus partnerships advanced in the name of global citizenship, The Globalsl Network now represents more than 15 institutions concerned with best practices and transformative outcomes.

Keynotes and plenaries will focus on Asset-based Local Engagement and Inclusive Community Building in the United States, On-Campus Organizing to Ensure Ethical Engagement in Health-Related Environments around the World, and The Praxis of Engineering: Theory and Value-Driven Practice. A full program is forthcoming; the overall schedule is available here. Early bird registration ($350) is available through July 15; be sure to book your accommodations and travel.

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Student and Faculty opportunity- Submit your work to Collaborations

Collaborations: A Journal of Community Research and Practice is a partnership between the University of Miami and Rutgers University that operates using a non-profit, open access (OA) model. Collaborations are free for anyone to read and there are no submission fees or article processing charges (APCs) whatsoever for authors and dedicated to the open dissemination of peer-reviewed scholarly and/or applied work that features mutually beneficial collaboration between university and community partners.

The journal is interested in papers (or other media) authored by or in close collaboration with community members and submissions from students involved in community-engaged learning, research, and action.

A great opportunity to disseminate community-engaged scholarship!

April 03, 2019

Professor Leslie Jacobson, a Nashman Affiliate Faculty member and chair of the Faculty Learning Community on Community Engagement and the Arts, was honored at a retirement celebration commemorating her 42 years of teaching at GW and her commitment to students and the community. Read the coverage in GW Today about the event here. You can click here to learn more about our FLCs and click here to learn more about our other great Nashman Affiliate Faculty!

May 10, 2019

Thanks to everyone who attended, presented and supported the Spring 2019 Nashman Symposium on Community Engaged Scholarship!
The symposium brought students and faculty from The Schools of Nursing, Business, Engineering, Education, Medicine, Media and Public Affairs, Columbian College, community partners working with students in courses and members of the GWU community together for an afternoon of community engaged scholarship discussion and dissemination. 75 students presented their work at the symposium showcase using video galleries, posters or laptop presentations to show attendees their research findings in unique ways. Students discussed a wide variety of topics-some presented information on their service site, others showcased community engaged research projects. Many of the student presenters are enrolled in courses designated by the Nashman Center as community engaged https://givepul.se/0xnbhq and their research and service in the community are woven into course objectives.

During lunch participants discussed data from the National Center on Citizenship DC Civic Health Index https://ncoc.org/research-type/2014dcchi/ at their tables with faculty facilitators and challenged each other to think about what kind of neighbors we are when we work with and in the DC community.

The day ended with reflection panels led by students and faculty with discussions on a wide range of issues including sustainability, Knapp Fellowship and Eco-Equity Projects, service with Latinx communities, community service as good business, pathways to service and issues of race and service.

We thank everyone for being part of Community Engaged Scholarship at GWU!

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Thanks to everyone who attended, presented and supported the Spring 2019 Nashman Symposium on Community Engaged Scholarship!

The symposium brought students and faculty from The Schools of Nursing, Business, Engineering, Education, Medicine, Media and Public Affairs, Columbian College, community partners working with students in courses and members of the GWU community together for an afternoon of community engaged scholarship discussion and dissemination.  75 students presented their work at the symposium showcase using video galleries, posters or laptop presentations to show attendees their research findings in unique ways.  Students discussed a wide variety of topics-some presented information on their service site, others showcased community engaged research projects.  Many of the student presenters are enrolled in courses designated by the Nashman Center as community engaged https://givepul.se/0xnbhq and their research and service in the community are woven into course objectives.

During lunch participants discussed data from the National Center on Citizenship DC Civic Health Index https://ncoc.org/research-type/2014dcchi/ at their tables with faculty facilitators and challenged each other to think about what kind of neighbors we are when we work with and in the DC community.

The day ended with reflection panels led by students and faculty with discussions on a wide range of issues including sustainability, Knapp Fellowship and Eco-Equity Projects, service with Latinx communities, community service as good business, pathways to service and issues of race and service.

We thank everyone for being part of Community Engaged Scholarship at GWU!

 

If your summer writing list is long and your research needs to be disseminated you need a writing retreat!

Pen to Paper is an academic writing retreat designed to provide time, space, and resources to guide faculty, professional staff, graduate students, and community partners working on manuscripts related to service-learning and community engagement. The two and a half-day retreat provides participants with time to discuss ideas with and receive feedback from editors, share ideas with peers, and write.

Each year attendance is intentionally kept to a minimum in order to foster personal connections the small group provides the space participants need to focus on engaged scholarship. Registration and information here https://indianacampuscompact.org/pen-to-paper/

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Nashman Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Phyllis Ryder

Professor Ryder is an Associate Professor of Writing specializing in service learning, composition, academic literacy, faculty librarian partnerships for teaching academic research, rhetoric of democracy, public and community writing. Itohan Amu, a Community Engaged Scholar at the Nashman Center, sat down with Dr. Ryder to learn more about her work.

She has two current publications. The first is a book, Rhetorics for Community Action: Public Writing and Writing Publics https://www.amazon.com/Rhetorics-Community-Action-Cultural-Pedagogy/dp/0739137662 . The second is an article about her evolving understanding of the community partners that she works with, From Reciprocity to Interdependence: Mass Incarceration and Service Learning available here http://proxygw.wrlc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=121172789&site=ehost-live

We asked Professor Ryder how she incorporates service learning into her courses. She allows “students to work with organizations in DC in order to have a context to really think about language, writing and communication and also because it sparks some questions that students will often research”.  She made clear that she likes it because it helps people to understand that there’s a deeper purpose for the scholarship that happens at the university and understand the amount of impact that the students can make on the community by answering real world questions. Over the years, Professor Ryder has worked with over 20 community partners including: Life Pieces to Masterpieces, DC Central Kitchen, Free Minds Book Club, US Dream Academy and many more.

During the course of her class, Professor Ryder talks about what’s actually happening among community organizations and how they conceptualize social change while doing their work and what it means to bring a community together. Professor Ryder believes that it is important for GW students and professors to be involved in the community because it forces them to keep testing their assumptions. It’s important for them to understand the issues happening today and the new layers that come with it. She stated that “what’s happening on the ground is dynamic and if we’re not plugged into that, then scholars and teachers are not necessarily doing their scholarship fully and are teaching in a limited way. Having that engagement with community keeps them humble and keeps them to adapt theories and goals.”

The Nashman Center appreciates Dr. Ryder’s work as a Nashman Affiliate, she chairs the Black Lives Matter Faculty Learning Community learn more about their work here and community engaged work in her course which you can learn more about here.

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Thanks to everyone who attended, presented and supported the Spring 2019 Nashman Symposium on Community Engaged Scholarship!

The symposium brought students and faculty from The Schools of Nursing, Business, Engineering, Education, Medicine, Media and Public Affairs, Columbian College, community partners working with students in courses and members of the GWU community together for an afternoon of community engaged scholarship discussion and dissemination.  75 students presented their work at the symposium showcase using video galleries, posters or laptop presentations to show attendees their research findings in unique ways.  Students discussed a wide variety of topics-some presented information on their service site, others showcased community engaged research projects.  Many of the student presenters are enrolled in courses designated by the Nashman Center as community engaged https://givepul.se/0xnbhq and their research and service in the community are woven into course objectives.

During lunch participants discussed data from the National Center on Citizenship DC Civic Health Index https://ncoc.org/research-type/2014dcchi/ at their tables with faculty facilitators and challenged each other to think about what kind of neighbors we are when we work with and in the DC community.

The day ended with reflection panels led by students and faculty with discussions on a wide range of issues including sustainability, Knapp Fellowship and Eco-Equity Projects, service with Latinx communities, community service as good business, pathways to service and issues of race and service.

We thank everyone for being part of Community Engaged Scholarship at GWU!

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New Article! Nashman Affiliate Faculty Member Jordan Potash: Relational Social Justice Ethics for Art Therapists in Art Therapy

Abstract: Relational social justice integrates psychological theories and practices with political and social change paradigms to situate relationships as central to ethical decision making. The core of this approach entails strong assurance of human rights and commitment to dialogue across racial, cultural, social, and political differences. Typical patterns that characterize protesters and opponents as enemies are replaced with both functioning as partners in the quest for social change. Art therapists can employ the relational approach to ethics when engaging with policymakers, colleagues, and clients to challenge injustice and reimagine societal norms.

Download article here through Gelman Library Access: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07421656.2018.1554019

Learn more about Dr. Potash’s work here: http://arttherapy.columbian.gwu.edu/jordan-potash and here  http://www.jordanpotash.com/

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I am drawing connections between their sense of belonging and creating a community of practice

“I am drawing connections between their sense of belonging and creating a community of practice within our school community to help affect their academic achievement.”

Kristen Mclnerney is a Knapp Fellow for the 2018-2019 school year. Her research is on newly arrived immigrant students’ experiences in high school and honoring their voices. She has some big takeaways from her Fellowship year. “I have learned so much this year, including survey development, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods, and going through the IRB process. It has been a difficult but great year. What first started as just ideas, has started to come to fruition. I still have a lot to do but the research is coming together in a way that I never thought was possible. The Nashman Center connected me with the GW Art Therapy Department to build community connections for the school that I work at and also with Dr. Jordan Potash who has helped create a living mural lesson plan that will help our students and staff create a mural.”

The Knapp Fellowship made Kristen’s ideas possible and she completed a pilot study. “The funds have helped me get study items translated to Amharic, Dari, Spanish, and Arabic for my students and their families. Translation services are very expensive; the Fellowship enabled me to make the IRB and research process accessible in home languages.”  Kristen recently presented her preliminary data at the CIES conference in San Francisco in April. She notes that this work will extend into next year, and data from the pilot study, will inform a larger study in the fall, Kristen’s dissertation study. Presenting at the Symposium provides her with the opportunity to receive feedback and connect with other students. She notes, “the opportunity to present at the community Symposium through the Nashman Center provides practice in presenting my data and opportunities to connect with other students and faculty. I even had a few students volunteer to help as research assistants in the Fall. The connection with folks and the questions they ask after they heard my presentation was a great opportunity to get feedback.”  McInerney finds her two-year research process very rewarding. “Through the Nashman Center, I’ve connected the community with my school. There are doors being opened now with faith-based organizations and other parts of GW with my school.  I’ve learned that our GW and local community is extremely generous and that there are bridges just waiting to be built. It’s absolutely worth taking the time to build those bridges and deepen those connections between the community and our school.”

Kristen has undeniably made great connections in her Knapp Fellowship year to propel her project even further. The Nashman Center is proud of Kristen’s community engaged scholarship!