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Photo by Matt Ridley on Unsplash

As Himmelfarb Library begins the transition into Our New Normal, you may have questions about where to access certain services and resources we provide. Here’s a guide on what you’ll find available online and in-person.

Online

All of our e-journals, e-databases, and e-books remain available online. We also provide our Documents2Go service entirely online, where you can request articles unavailable in our collection.

We offer instructions on downloading and installing our mobile apps to your device.

There is a host of information available on our Research Guides, everything from question banks to anatomy images, and much more!

Himmelfarb’s Reference team is also available online. Our chat service is monitored by reference staff 8:30AM-8PM EST Monday through Thursday and 8:30AM-5PM EST Friday. Have a question a little too involved for chat? We can also schedule individual meetings with a reference librarian via WebEx. Email us at himmelfarb@gwu.edu to start the process!

In-Person

In addition to our print collection available in our book stacks, you can also find our multimedia collection, audiovisual collection, and software resources on the third floor, in the Bloedorn Technology Center.

Our special collections, the Humanities & Health collection, Historical collection, and Healthy Living collection, are all accessible in-person.

Some of our older journals are kept in on-site storage as bound volumes. You can request a specific volume for perusal by following the instructions on our Borrowing and Requesting page.

Anatomy models are available in various places throughout the library. Our skeletal models and bone boxes are up on the third floor. Heart and brain models can be checked out at the Circulation desk.

If you have any questions about access as we move forward with Our New Normal, reach out to us at himmelfarb@gwu.edu or call the Circulation Desk at 202-994-2962.

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Image by Alberto G. on flickr.

In Wednesday’s blog post we shared Himmelfarb Library’s electronic clinical case study resources to incorporate in your online instruction. Today we’d like to share some of the electronic question banks Himmelfarb provides access to. While Himmelfarb provides access, in order to unlock all features you must create a personal account. Instructions for doing so are provided.

Exam Master Medical Subject Review provides over 9,000 questions and explanations to prepare for the USMLE Steps 1, 2, and 3. Exam Master tries to emulate the board exams, helping students build confidence by identifying strengths and improving on weaknesses. In order to use Himmelfarb’s Exam Master, you must make a free Exam Master account, then access Exam Master while on campus or when logged in to the VPN.

USMLEasy offers questions and answers to prepare for Steps 1, 2 CK, and 3. Their customization feature allows you to select topic coverage and the number of questions. You’re also able to annotate exam questions and answers. In order to access USMLEasy, access the webpage through the provided link and create a personal profile.

BoardVitals provides test banks for NBME Shelf Exams in seven different medical subjects. Features include timed test conditions, study tips, and individualized study recommendations based on practice test performance. In order to register, connect via the VPN and create an account at the link provided. After you’ve logged in once while connected to the VPN, you’ll be able to access your account from anywhere.

PA Exam Prep offers practice questions for PANCE and PANRE, as well as customizable features like topic coverage, number of questions, and annotation. In order to unlock these customizations, create a free account at the provided link.

For additional online instruction resources, check out Himmelfarb’s Online Instruction Research Guide. Our librarians are happy to assist with any questions you might have as well. Email us at himmelfarb@gwu.edu, or connect via our Ask Us chat.

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AccessMedicine has introduced several new features to support learning across the continuum of medical education - from undergraduate to continuing medical education.  AccessMedicine features nearly 150 full-text books including key titles such as Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (20th ed), Basic & Clinical Biostatistics (4th ed.), and Symptom to Diagnosis: An Evidence-Based Guide (3rd ed.).

In addition to its full-text library, AccessMedicine offers resources to support study and learning.  To complement its already robust collection of drug information, multimedia materials, cases, and study tools, AccessMedicine has introduced several new features including:

AccessMedicine is available from on-and off-campus locations.  Please contact Laura Abate (leabate@gwu.edu) with questions.

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AccessMedicine has launched a series of focused 3D modules designed to guide medical and health sciences students through systems-based tours of human anatomy.  The modules are designed with an eye toward learning anatomy via an interactive,visual, and systems-based methodology.
This new 3D series currently includes 7 modules: brain, endocrine system, gastrointestinal system, heart, respiratory system, spine, and urinary system.  Additional 3D modules will be made available in this collection throughout the coming year.
AccessMedicine users can also access complete human anatomy modules.   The complete human modules allow for visualization of male and female human bodies in an interactive, 3D format.
AccessMedicine is available to all GW users from both on-and off-campus locations.  If you have questions about this resource or about online access, please contact Laura Abate (leabate@gwu.edu).

Bring your ideas to life as 3D printed objects!

Courtesy of a grant from the GW Hospital Women's Board, Himmelfarb Library now has a 3D printer available to faculty, residents, students, and staff of GW's School of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Nursing, Milken Institute School of Public Health, the GW Medical Faculty Associates, and the GW Hospital.

Use our 3D Printing at Himmelfarb guide to learn about Himmelfarb's 3D printing policies and FAQs, where to find 3D models, and to learn about scholarly uses of 3D printing!

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PolicyMap now provides access to new life expectancy data from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.  This data provides standardized life expectancy data at census tract level, and allows identification of neighborhood-level differences in life expectancy as shown in this map of life expectancy in Washington, DC using CDC data on 'Life expectancy at birth, as of 2010-2015'.

Learn more about this data and PolicyMap functionality via PolicyMap's article Knowing Life Expectancy to Improve Public Health.

 

Himmelfarb Library provides access to  PolicyMap  .  To learn more about PolicyMap, please ask us, review the PolicyMap YouTube Channel, or check out tutorials including:

 

  • Maps: easily display data using different geographic parameters
  • Tables: View data as a bar graph or chart to compare multiple geographies
  • Reports: Run reports for predefined geographic areas or create a custom area
  • 3-Layer maps: Find areas that meet up to three criteria for site selection or to locate hot spots
  • Data loader: updaload your own address-level data
  • Data download: download PolicyMap data for use in your research

 

 

policymapPolicyMap is now available via Himmelarb Library!
PolicyMap allows users to create maps by combing access to a data library with mapping and reporting tools.  PolicyMap provides access to more that 150 data sources and also allows users to upload their own data.  Users can then create maps, generate reports, and run analytics.
To learn more about PolicyMap, you can look at PolicyMap YouTube Channel or check out tutorials including:
  • Maps: easily display data using different geographic parameters
  • Tables: View data as a bar graph or chart to compare multiple geographies
  • Reports: Run reports for predefined geographic areas or create a custom area
  • 3-Layer maps: Find areas that meet up to three criteria for site selection or to locate hot spots
  • Data loader: updaload your own address-level data
  • Data download: download PolicyMap data for use in your research
PolicyMap is available from on- and off-campus locations.  Off-campus users can access PolicyMap via either VPN or web-based login.  If you have questions, please contact Laura Abate (leabate@gwu.edu).

visiblebodyhumananatomyatlasVisible Body Human Anatomy Atlas provides a new way to study and explore anatomy. This online anatomy atlas allows users to view specific structures and layers from head to toe, rotate anatomical models, and explore systemic and regional anatomy.

Visible Body Human Anatomy Atlas includes 5,000+ medically accurate anatomical structures and was developed by medically trained illustrators and reviewed by anatomists. This atlas allows users to explore human anatomy via multiple approaches: systemic anatomy, regional anatomy, cross sections, senses, and muscle actions.

If you're an instructor interested in using Visible Body Human Anatomy Atlas in instruction, you can explore examples of its integration and course materials on the Visible Body Education webpage.

This resource is available to users from on- and off-campus locations as well as as an app. For web access, system requirements will display when you access the resource, and additional information is available via the Support Troubleshooting FAQ.    For app access, please consult the Visible Body Human Anatomy Atlas app instructions.

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How do you teach?  If you’re interested in adding innovation to your instruction, check out online modules made available by GW faculty!

Online teaching materials and modules serve as  great teaching tools in medical education.  GW’s SMHS and CNHS faculty have published these tools in the AAMC’s MedEdPortal, which houses open-source materials.  The teaching materials provide access to multiple documents, including powerpoints, guides, and surveys.

Some of the topics covered by the modules are newborn care, OB/GYN, navigating the wards and more!

Check out the modules here!

 

Scholarly publishing has undergone a significant transformation with the rise of the Internet. Scholarly journals are now predominantly available in electronic format rather than in traditional print formats.

This shift prompted the introduction of open access publishing - a movement that aims to provide scholarly research to researchers and the public at no cost to the reader, thus removing the cost barrier to access research.

However, this movement has also opened the door for “predatory” journals to use open access model to profit from researchers and faculty who are pressured to publish in order to receive promotion and tenure.  A comparison of the similarities and differences in characteristics of both predatory and legitimate journals could help readers and potential authors spot predatory journals more easily.

A recent article published in the March 2017 issue of BMC Medicine provides the results of just such a comparison. A cross-sectional comparison of potentially predatory, presumed legitimate open access, and presumed legitimate subscription-based biomedical journals was conducted. Roughly 100 randomly selected journals in each category was selected for this review. Each journal was evaluated on criteria within specific characteristics including:

  • Aims & scope
  • Journal name & publisher
  • Homepage integrity (look & feel)
  • Indexing & impact factor
  • Editors & staff
  • Editorial process & peer review
  • Publication ethics & policies
  • Publication model & copyright
  • Journal location & contact

The results are summarized in this infographic:

https://magic.piktochart.com/embed/22961232-predatory-vs-legitimate-can-you-tell-the-difference

Source:
Shamseer, L., Moher, D., Maduekwe, O., Turner, L., Barbour, V., Burch, R., & ... Shea, B. J. (2017). Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison. BMC Medicine, 15(1), 28. doi:10.1186/s12916-017-0785-9

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