Public Exhibitions Feature International Storylines and Destinations

Seems like everywhere you turn at the Elliott School, you’ll find a new photo exhibit highlighting its students, its significant areas of research, or partnerships with local embassies. Making use of the available community spaces in the building to showcase the wide-ranging blend of art and research through the prism of international affairs makes for an #onlyatGW experience. All exhibits are free and open to the public on weekdays 7am -10 pm.


CURRENT EXHIBITIONS at the Elliott School of International Affairs

Basement: Colors of Ecuador, featuring the work of Ecuadorian artist, Manuel Avilés, consists of  15 photos of Ecuador’s people and landscapes. (Runs through Oct 14)

1st Floor: 3rd Annual Study Abroad Photo Competition, a group exhibition of photos taken by Elliott School students during their studies and travel abroad. (Runs through Nov 30)

Second Floor: The Researcher and His/Her Fieldwork in Central Eurasia
As part of the 20th Annual Conference, Central Asian Studies Society (CESS), the organizers invited scholars and journalists to submit photos of Central Eurasia that reflect on the relationship between the researcher and the object of research and illuminate the different faces of fieldwork. (Runs through Oct 30)

COMING EXHIBITIONS at the Elliott School of International Affairs

Basement: Beginning Oct 22
We want Freedom: The Fall of the Communist Regime in Slovakia in 1989
In celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, the Embassy of Slovakia in cooperation with the Bratislava-based Nation’s Memory Institute will display an exhibit to commemorate the tragedy of people in Czechoslovakia under the  years of totalitarian regime, as well as the extraordinary moments that led to its demise. 

2nd Floor: Beginning Nov 11, 2019
Waging Peace exhibit opening and reception 5:00-7:30 pm, 2nd floor Atrium
November 15th marks the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War Mobilization March on Washington, a gathering of over half a million demonstrators against the war. Engaging participation from across the university and the local community, we offer a series of events to educate students and the general public about often overlooked facets of the history of US involvement in Vietnam, including the impact that antiwar GIs and veterans had on ending the war.

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